"Druids were thought to have worn hooded robes and carry an oak staff. Some accounts say they shaved their foreheads from ear to ear. There was likely an air of mystery surrounding them and they were highly respected, venerated and even feared. It is said that they were not the image of the pious priest who abstained from sex and lust ” ~ Eckert
image Ph1sch

"Druids were thought to have worn hooded robes and carry an oak staff. Some accounts say they shaved their foreheads from ear to ear. There was likely an air of mystery surrounding them and they were highly respected, venerated and even feared. It is said that they were not the image of the pious priest who abstained from sex and lust ” ~ Eckert

image Ph1sch

Origins: Roots of Hallowe’en are Found in Ancient Observations ~
As millions participate in the fun of Halloween on the night of October 31st, few will be aware of its ancient Celtic roots in the Samhain/Samain/Samhuinn festival. In Celtic lands about 2,000 years ago, Samhain was the division of the year between the lighter half (summer) and the darker half (winter) marking the new year. At Samhain the division between this world and the otherworld was at its thinnest, allowing spirits to pass through.
The family’s ancestors were honoured and invited home whilst harmful spirits were warded off. People wore costumes and masks to disguise themselves as ominous spirits and thus avoid harm. Bonfires and food played a large part in the festivities. The bones of slaughtered livestock were cast into a communal fire, household fires were extinguished and started again from the bonfire. Food was prepared for the living and the dead, food for the ancestors who were in no position it eat it, was ritually shared with the less well off.
Christianity incorporated the honouring of the dead into the Christian calendar with All Saints (All Hallows) on November 1st, followed by All Souls on November 2nd. The wearing of costumes and masks to ward off harmful spirits survived as Halloween customs. The Irish and Scottish emigrated to America in great numbers during the 19th century especially around the time of famine in Ireland during the 1840’s. They carried their Hallowe’en traditions to America, where today it is one of the major holidays of the year. Through time other traditions have blended into Halloween.
Two hills in the Boyne Valley were associated with Samhain in Celtic Ireland, Tlachtga and Tara. Tlachtga was the location of the Great Fire Festival which begun on the eve of Samhain. Tara was also associated with Samhain, however it was secondary to Tlachtga in this respect.
The entrance passage to the Mound of the Hostages on the Hill of Tara is aligned with the rising sun around Samhain. The Mound of the Hostages is 4,500 to 5000 years old, suggesting that the observation which came to be known as Samhain which evoled into Hallowe’en was celebrated long before the first Celts arrived about 2,500 years ago…

Origins: Roots of Hallowe’en are Found in Ancient Observations ~

As millions participate in the fun of Halloween on the night of October 31st, few will be aware of its ancient Celtic roots in the Samhain/Samain/Samhuinn festival. In Celtic lands about 2,000 years ago, Samhain was the division of the year between the lighter half (summer) and the darker half (winter) marking the new year. At Samhain the division between this world and the otherworld was at its thinnest, allowing spirits to pass through.

The family’s ancestors were honoured and invited home whilst harmful spirits were warded off. People wore costumes and masks to disguise themselves as ominous spirits and thus avoid harm. Bonfires and food played a large part in the festivities. The bones of slaughtered livestock were cast into a communal fire, household fires were extinguished and started again from the bonfire. Food was prepared for the living and the dead, food for the ancestors who were in no position it eat it, was ritually shared with the less well off.

Christianity incorporated the honouring of the dead into the Christian calendar with All Saints (All Hallows) on November 1st, followed by All Souls on November 2nd. The wearing of costumes and masks to ward off harmful spirits survived as Halloween customs. The Irish and Scottish emigrated to America in great numbers during the 19th century especially around the time of famine in Ireland during the 1840’s. They carried their Hallowe’en traditions to America, where today it is one of the major holidays of the year. Through time other traditions have blended into Halloween.

Two hills in the Boyne Valley were associated with Samhain in Celtic Ireland, Tlachtga and Tara. Tlachtga was the location of the Great Fire Festival which begun on the eve of Samhain. Tara was also associated with Samhain, however it was secondary to Tlachtga in this respect.

The entrance passage to the Mound of the Hostages on the Hill of Tara is aligned with the rising sun around Samhain. The Mound of the Hostages is 4,500 to 5000 years old, suggesting that the observation which came to be known as Samhain which evoled into Hallowe’en was celebrated long before the first Celts arrived about 2,500 years ago…

Logan McCree
image Denis Pushkin

Logan McCree

image Denis Pushkin

Skyclad Ritual
image Lost Wanderer

Skyclad Ritual

image Lost Wanderer

The Lusty Month of May: A Time of Celebration For The Horned God ~
In ancient times, it is believed the time correlating with today’s calendar week falling near the 19th of May celebrated the Feasts of the Horned God - Cernunnos or Herne (as antlered) in Celtic/Britonnic tradition and Faunus/Pan (as goat-horned) in Graeco/Roman tradition.
Interconnected observations of the Horned God in his multi-manifestations may occur nowadays for many who claim him as their patron. The Horned One is known as the primeval God of male sexual vitality. In Celtic locales, Cernunnos’ feast was thought observed at 18 May where virility was celebrated among men. In Graeco-Roman culture the week-long festival of Faunus/Pan, called “Panalia” occurred.
Festivities were a paean to male sexuality and masculinity. Various reports convey that men may have observed these times by dancing nude - sometimes while wearing gigantic, stuffed or specially-fashioned phalli for emphasis. It is also surmised they celebrated with a variety of sexual activities - including masturbation as Pan was the God of the act and with potentially androphilic pleasures as the emphasis was on the masculine aspect. Ithyphallic (erect) statues were especially popular.
These events are further evidence of what has lyrically been called the “lusty month of May” which starts with the fests of Beltane, May Day and others. The phallic celebrations of the Panic feasts correlate with contemporary designations for May such as its being declared “Masturbation Month” in recent times. With the full Moon in Scorpio which is opposite the Sun in Taurus. The month potentially owes some of its sensuousness to the Moon in the sign that rules sexuality, at the same time that the Sun is in the sign ruled by Venus. Alchemically and esoterically, the Scorpionic power of rebirth and transformation, beginning at the Full Moon, combines with the earthy tenacity and drive of Taurus and the sheer beauty of Venus to lend this season its uncommon juice, stamina and eroticism.
The emphasis during this time was/is the manly element in life - relationships of brotherhood, celebration of virility, male sexuality, prowess and bonding wherein the Horned One is recognized as a protector of men, the giver of potency and the progenitor of the masculine divine in life…

The Lusty Month of May: A Time of Celebration For The Horned God ~

In ancient times, it is believed the time correlating with today’s calendar week falling near the 19th of May celebrated the Feasts of the Horned God - Cernunnos or Herne (as antlered) in Celtic/Britonnic tradition and Faunus/Pan (as goat-horned) in Graeco/Roman tradition.

Interconnected observations of the Horned God in his multi-manifestations may occur nowadays for many who claim him as their patron. The Horned One is known as the primeval God of male sexual vitality. In Celtic locales, Cernunnos’ feast was thought observed at 18 May where virility was celebrated among men. In Graeco-Roman culture the week-long festival of Faunus/Pan, called “Panalia” occurred.

Festivities were a paean to male sexuality and masculinity. Various reports convey that men may have observed these times by dancing nude - sometimes while wearing gigantic, stuffed or specially-fashioned phalli for emphasis. It is also surmised they celebrated with a variety of sexual activities - including masturbation as Pan was the God of the act and with potentially androphilic pleasures as the emphasis was on the masculine aspect. Ithyphallic (erect) statues were especially popular.

These events are further evidence of what has lyrically been called the “lusty month of May” which starts with the fests of Beltane, May Day and others. The phallic celebrations of the Panic feasts correlate with contemporary designations for May such as its being declared “Masturbation Month” in recent times. With the full Moon in Scorpio which is opposite the Sun in Taurus. The month potentially owes some of its sensuousness to the Moon in the sign that rules sexuality, at the same time that the Sun is in the sign ruled by Venus. Alchemically and esoterically, the Scorpionic power of rebirth and transformation, beginning at the Full Moon, combines with the earthy tenacity and drive of Taurus and the sheer beauty of Venus to lend this season its uncommon juice, stamina and eroticism.

The emphasis during this time was/is the manly element in life - relationships of brotherhood, celebration of virility, male sexuality, prowess and bonding wherein the Horned One is recognized as a protector of men, the giver of potency and the progenitor of the masculine divine in life…

Spring Fever: Beltaine Celebrates The Lust For Life ~ 
Beltaine is one of eight solar Sabbats. The observation in this time often incorporates traditions from the Gaelic Bealtaine, such as the bonfire, and bears relation as well to the Nordic/Teutonic/Germanic Walpurgis and Saxon May Day festivals, both in its significance (focusing on fertility) and its rituals (such as May pole dancing).  Some celebrate this holiday on May 1 or May Day, whiles others begin their observations the eve before or April 30th.
Beltaine has long been observed with varied feasts and rituals and is one festival among many worldwide which recognizes this time of year. The name itself is thought to mean “Fire of Bel”. As spring turns into summer and the plant and animal world blossom and reproduce - a hopeful feeling emerged among the ancients. It is surmised that in old Celtic traditions, this was a time of what today could be called ‘unbridled’ sexual freedom. Handfastings of a year and a day could be undertaken at this time. Given knowledge of Celtic sexuality it is speculated by some that expression at Beltaine may also have included liaisons of various natures not exclusively ‘heterosexual’ in definition.
Belenos (Bel, Belenus, Belinos) is one of the most ancient and widely worshipped of the Celtic deities and generally was associated with pastoralism, virilism & fertility. He is celebrated at this time where his coronation is observed. He heralds the beginning of warmer weather, the blossoming of flora, birth of fauna, love & erotic expression and brought on an exuberant,-even lustful- mood among celebrants.
Beltaine was one festival involving fire and its associated puritive qualities seen in many aspects and elements of the observation often leading people of later times to identify Bel as a solar deity. In the past, young people would spend the entire night in the woods “A-Maying,” and then dance around the phallic Maypole the next morning. Later on, older married couples were allowed to remove their wedding rings (and the restrictions they imply) for this one night. May morning is a magical time for wild water - dew (from Hawthorn trees particularly), flowing streams and springs) may be collected and used to bathe in for beauty or to drink for health. The May pole was a focal point of the old village rituals. Many people would rise at the first light of dawn to go outdoors and gather flowers and branches to decorate their homes. People traditionally would braid flowers into their hair. Men and women alike would decorate their potentially scantily clad bodies.
Beltaine marks the return of vitality, virility, fertility and passion and in many ways is a time representative of the male aspect - the God. Pagan traditions say that Beltaine recognizes the emergence of the young God into manhood. Stirred by the energies at work in nature, he desires the Goddess. They fall in love, lie among the grasses and blossoms - and unite. The Goddess becomes pregnant of the God and to celebrate, a wedding feast was prepared. Modern interpretations may see it as a time for both the male and female aspect within each person to be celebrated and held in unity…
Beannachtaí Bealtaine!!!…

Spring Fever: Beltaine Celebrates The Lust For Life ~ 

Beltaine is one of eight solar Sabbats. The observation in this time often incorporates traditions from the Gaelic Bealtaine, such as the bonfire, and bears relation as well to the Nordic/Teutonic/Germanic Walpurgis and Saxon May Day festivals, both in its significance (focusing on fertility) and its rituals (such as May pole dancing).  Some celebrate this holiday on May 1 or May Day, whiles others begin their observations the eve before or April 30th.

Beltaine has long been observed with varied feasts and rituals and is one festival among many worldwide which recognizes this time of year. The name itself is thought to mean “Fire of Bel”. As spring turns into summer and the plant and animal world blossom and reproduce - a hopeful feeling emerged among the ancients. It is surmised that in old Celtic traditions, this was a time of what today could be called ‘unbridled’ sexual freedom. Handfastings of a year and a day could be undertaken at this time. Given knowledge of Celtic sexuality it is speculated by some that expression at Beltaine may also have included liaisons of various natures not exclusively ‘heterosexual’ in definition.

Belenos (Bel, Belenus, Belinos) is one of the most ancient and widely worshipped of the Celtic deities and generally was associated with pastoralism, virilism & fertility. He is celebrated at this time where his coronation is observed. He heralds the beginning of warmer weather, the blossoming of flora, birth of fauna, love & erotic expression and brought on an exuberant,-even lustful- mood among celebrants.

Beltaine was one festival involving fire and its associated puritive qualities seen in many aspects and elements of the observation often leading people of later times to identify Bel as a solar deity. In the past, young people would spend the entire night in the woods “A-Maying,” and then dance around the phallic Maypole the next morning. Later on, older married couples were allowed to remove their wedding rings (and the restrictions they imply) for this one night. May morning is a magical time for wild water - dew (from Hawthorn trees particularly), flowing streams and springs) may be collected and used to bathe in for beauty or to drink for health. The May pole was a focal point of the old village rituals. Many people would rise at the first light of dawn to go outdoors and gather flowers and branches to decorate their homes. People traditionally would braid flowers into their hair. Men and women alike would decorate their potentially scantily clad bodies.

Beltaine marks the return of vitality, virility, fertility and passion and in many ways is a time representative of the male aspect - the God. Pagan traditions say that Beltaine recognizes the emergence of the young God into manhood. Stirred by the energies at work in nature, he desires the Goddess. They fall in love, lie among the grasses and blossoms - and unite. The Goddess becomes pregnant of the God and to celebrate, a wedding feast was prepared. Modern interpretations may see it as a time for both the male and female aspect within each person to be celebrated and held in unity…

Beannachtaí Bealtaine!!!…

image Felix Wong

image Felix Wong

Man contemplating a skull - 1875
by Thomas Couture

Man contemplating a skull - 1875

by Thomas Couture

image Izayah Jeffrey

image Izayah Jeffrey