"Druids were thought to have worn hooded robes and carry an oak staff. Some accounts say they shaved their foreheads from ear to ear. There was likely an air of mystery surrounding them and they were highly respected, venerated and even feared. It is said that they were not the image of the pious priest who abstained from sex and lust ” ~ Eckert
image Ph1sch

"Druids were thought to have worn hooded robes and carry an oak staff. Some accounts say they shaved their foreheads from ear to ear. There was likely an air of mystery surrounding them and they were highly respected, venerated and even feared. It is said that they were not the image of the pious priest who abstained from sex and lust ” ~ Eckert

image Ph1sch

Calanais Stone Circle, Isle of Skye, Scotland ~
The Callanish Stones, Clachan Chalanais or Tursachan Chalanais in Gaelic, are situated near the village of Callanish (Gaelic: Calanais) on the west coast of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides (Western Isles of Scotland). Construction of the site took place between 2900 and 2600 BC, though there were possibly earlier buildings before 3000 BC. A tomb was later built into the site. Debris from the destruction of the tomb suggests the site was out of use between 2000 BC and 1700 BC.
The 13 primary stones form a circle about 13 m in diameter, with a long approach avenue of stones to the north, and shorter stone rows to the east, south, and west. The overall layout of the monument recalls a distorted Celtic cross.
The individual stones vary from around 1 m to 5 m in height, with an average of 4 m, and are of the local Lewisian gneiss…

Calanais Stone Circle, Isle of Skye, Scotland ~

The Callanish Stones, Clachan Chalanais or Tursachan Chalanais in Gaelic, are situated near the village of Callanish (Gaelic: Calanais) on the west coast of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides (Western Isles of Scotland).

Construction of the site took place between 2900 and 2600 BC, though there were possibly earlier buildings before 3000 BC. A tomb was later built into the site. Debris from the destruction of the tomb suggests the site was out of use between 2000 BC and 1700 BC.

The 13 primary stones form a circle about 13 m in diameter, with a long approach avenue of stones to the north, and shorter stone rows to the east, south, and west. The overall layout of the monument recalls a distorted Celtic cross.

The individual stones vary from around 1 m to 5 m in height, with an average of 4 m, and are of the local Lewisian gneiss…

Chûn Quoit in Cornwall, UK is believed to have been built around 2400 BCE. The granite stones have been seen inexplicably to flash short bursts of multi-coloured light across the undersurface of the structure said to last roughly half an hour. Radiation readings taken inside the chamber have revealed results 123% higher than the surrounding environment…

Chûn Quoit in Cornwall, UK is believed to have been built around 2400 BCE. The granite stones have been seen inexplicably to flash short bursts of multi-coloured light across the undersurface of the structure said to last roughly half an hour. Radiation readings taken inside the chamber have revealed results 123% higher than the surrounding environment…

image Felix Wong

image Felix Wong

Man contemplating a skull - 1875
by Thomas Couture

Man contemplating a skull - 1875

by Thomas Couture

image Izayah Jeffrey

image Izayah Jeffrey