Druids Cutting the Mistletoe on the Sixth Day of the Moon
by: Henri Paul Motte

Druids Cutting the Mistletoe on the Sixth Day of the Moon
by: Henri Paul Motte

image Lorenzo Ridolfi

image Lorenzo Ridolfi

Rémi Cholet

Rémi Cholet

"El Reposo Del Guerrero" by José Daniel Cabrera Peña

"El Reposo Del Guerrero" by José Daniel Cabrera Peña

"Birth of Cernnunos" by sculptor Philip Hitchcock

"Birth of Cernnunos" by sculptor Philip Hitchcock

The Irish-Celtic god of the earth and treaties, and ruler over life and death. Daghda, or The Dagda, (“the good god”) is one of the most prominent gods and the leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann. He is a master of magic, a fearsome warrior and a skilled artisan.
The Daghda is a son of the goddess Danu, and father of the goddess Brigid and the god Aengus mac Og. The Morrigan is his wife, with whom he mates on New Years Day He is portrayed as possessing both super- human strength and appetite.
His attributes are a cauldron with an inexhaustible supply of food, a magical harp with which he summons the seasons, and an enormous club, with one end of which he could kill nine men, but with the other restore them to life. He also possessed two miraculous swine—-one always roasting, the other always growing and trees continuously laden with fruit.
One of his epithets is Ollathir, which means “All-father”. He is identified with the Welsh Gwydion and the Gallic Sucellos.
image by Jeff Cullen

The Irish-Celtic god of the earth and treaties, and ruler over life and death. Daghda, or The Dagda, (“the good god”) is one of the most prominent gods and the leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann. He is a master of magic, a fearsome warrior and a skilled artisan.

The Daghda is a son of the goddess Danu, and father of the goddess Brigid and the god Aengus mac Og. The Morrigan is his wife, with whom he mates on New Years Day He is portrayed as possessing both super- human strength and appetite.

His attributes are a cauldron with an inexhaustible supply of food, a magical harp with which he summons the seasons, and an enormous club, with one end of which he could kill nine men, but with the other restore them to life. He also possessed two miraculous swine—-one always roasting, the other always growing and trees continuously laden with fruit.

One of his epithets is Ollathir, which means “All-father”. He is identified with the Welsh Gwydion and the Gallic Sucellos.

image by Jeff Cullen

image dawlinroxx
Cú Chulainn by Irish mythos/comic artist Will Sliney…

Cú Chulainn by Irish mythos/comic artist Will Sliney…

Cernosian Leatherman…

Cernosian Leatherman…

by Delaney LaFae

by Delaney LaFae

A Highland Shepherd
by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer, R.A. (1802-1873)

A Highland Shepherd

by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer, R.A. (1802-1873)