The “Yes” lads raise support for the Independence vote…

On 24 February, “Brave” won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature at the annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles. Kilted director Mark Andrews took to the stage wearing the Dunbroch tartan created for association with the film and thanked the Pixar team and Brenda Chapman (his co-director) whose daughter served as the inspiration for Merida, the story’s heroine…

associated: http://celteros.tumblr.com/post/25720553862/the-brave-tartan-the-dunbroch-tartan-was

This original “Jack-o-lantern” made from a turnip in the early 19th century is on exhibit at the Museum of Country Life in Ireland. 
The making of jack-o’-lanterns, some sources maintain, springs theoretically from the custom of carving turnips into lanterns as a way of remembering the souls held in purgatory. The practice is said to have originated from an Irish tale about a man nicknamed “Stingy Jack” who had dealings with the “devil”. As the story went, when he died, he wasn’t good enough for heaven and the devil wouldn’t let him into hell. The devil sent Jack away with coals which he put into a turnip to light his way in the dark.
While turnips and even potatoes had been used in Ireland, lanterns in Scotland were originally fashioned from the thick stem of the cabbage plant and were called “kail-runt torches”. It was not until 1837 that “jack-o’-lantern” appeared as a term for a carved vegetable lit from within.
Eventually pumpkins were chosen by Irish immigrants who brought the tradition with them to the home of the pumpkin - North America - where it became an integral part of Halloween festivities there. The term “jack-o’-lantern” originally meant a ‘night watchman’ or ‘man with a lantern’ with the earliest known use in the 1660’s in East Anglia…

This original “Jack-o-lantern” made from a turnip in the early 19th century is on exhibit at the Museum of Country Life in Ireland.

The making of jack-o’-lanterns, some sources maintain, springs theoretically from the custom of carving turnips into lanterns as a way of remembering the souls held in purgatory. The practice is said to have originated from an Irish tale about a man nicknamed “Stingy Jack” who had dealings with the “devil”. As the story went, when he died, he wasn’t good enough for heaven and the devil wouldn’t let him into hell. The devil sent Jack away with coals which he put into a turnip to light his way in the dark.

While turnips and even potatoes had been used in Ireland, lanterns in Scotland were originally fashioned from the thick stem of the cabbage plant and were called “kail-runt torches”. It was not until 1837 that “jack-o’-lantern” appeared as a term for a carved vegetable lit from within.

Eventually pumpkins were chosen by Irish immigrants who brought the tradition with them to the home of the pumpkin - North America - where it became an integral part of Halloween festivities there. The term “jack-o’-lantern” originally meant a ‘night watchman’ or ‘man with a lantern’ with the earliest known use in the 1660’s in East Anglia…

The kilted Cannoneer

The kilted Cannoneer

Kilt Chronicler Extraordinaire: Photographer Richard Findlay Captures Scots Life Like No Other ~
Those interested in contemporary kilt life or Scottish themes have no doubt witnessed the exceptional photo work of Richard Findlay. He is arguably the most prolific photographer of kilt culture perhaps ever and certainly today. His comprehensive work is included in any search of the term “kilt” and has dispersed widely across media forms. He has become known as an undisputed authority of his subject.
An entertainment lawyer and business affairs consultant based in Edinburgh by profession, Findlay has taken his strong passion for photography of the kilt to the hilt. While Findlay confers that few photographers have shot kilted men so often – his is sort of a quest to promote ‘kilting’ as a norm rather than as an exception relating that if one travels the length and breadth of Scotland, countless examples can be found in everyday life.
He says of his work “my photo galleries have been described as ‘a view of life through the eyes of a kilted Edinburgh shooter exhibiting his pick of pics with a Scottish Twist”.
Apart from shooting the mountains, lochs and glens of Scotland, Findlay also captures people and events with a Scottish flavour particularly at Highland Games, Ceilidhs, the Edinburgh Military Tattoo and Scottish Rugby events.
Many of Findlay’s images are particularly notable as they employ many post production techniques including faux high dynamic range imaging (HDR) which provides higher contrast photos and many of Findlay’s works are instantly recognizable for their usage of this creative and striking process.
Often engaged to provide portraits for commercial or social networking sites via his brand FotoFling Scotland, he is also the official photographer for a major Highland Games organization in Scotland and receives many commissions for advertising, music events and other happenings.
Findlay should be lauded for the effort he continually puts behind his work for in doing so he provides us perhaps with the most substantial archive of ‘kilt culture’ photography to be had now or at any time before.
His work can be seen at a number of online venues but is best represented at his official site http://www.fotoflingscotland.co.uk/

Kilt Chronicler Extraordinaire: Photographer Richard Findlay Captures Scots Life Like No Other ~

Those interested in contemporary kilt life or Scottish themes have no doubt witnessed the exceptional photo work of Richard Findlay. He is arguably the most prolific photographer of kilt culture perhaps ever and certainly today. His comprehensive work is included in any search of the term “kilt” and has dispersed widely across media forms. He has become known as an undisputed authority of his subject.

An entertainment lawyer and business affairs consultant based in Edinburgh by profession, Findlay has taken his strong passion for photography of the kilt to the hilt. While Findlay confers that few photographers have shot kilted men so often – his is sort of a quest to promote ‘kilting’ as a norm rather than as an exception relating that if one travels the length and breadth of Scotland, countless examples can be found in everyday life.

He says of his work “my photo galleries have been described as ‘a view of life through the eyes of a kilted Edinburgh shooter exhibiting his pick of pics with a Scottish Twist”.

Apart from shooting the mountains, lochs and glens of Scotland, Findlay also captures people and events with a Scottish flavour particularly at Highland Games, Ceilidhs, the Edinburgh Military Tattoo and Scottish Rugby events.

Many of Findlay’s images are particularly notable as they employ many post production techniques including faux high dynamic range imaging (HDR) which provides higher contrast photos and many of Findlay’s works are instantly recognizable for their usage of this creative and striking process.

Often engaged to provide portraits for commercial or social networking sites via his brand FotoFling Scotland, he is also the official photographer for a major Highland Games organization in Scotland and receives many commissions for advertising, music events and other happenings.

Findlay should be lauded for the effort he continually puts behind his work for in doing so he provides us perhaps with the most substantial archive of ‘kilt culture’ photography to be had now or at any time before.

His work can be seen at a number of online venues but is best represented at his official site http://www.fotoflingscotland.co.uk/

Annie Lennox mystically-staged at London Olympics Closing Ceremony 2012

Annie Lennox mystically-staged at London Olympics Closing Ceremony 2012

Menswear house ISAIA’s tartan was designed for the label’s FW 2011-12 collection. The pattern has been listed with the Scottish Register of Tartans for archival preservation.

In the early 1920s, Enrico Isaia opened a small fabric shop in Napoli where he sold only goods intended for the production of fine men’s garments.

ISAIA manufactures made-to-measure clothing and has become one of the most of respected tailoring establishments in the world. Today the company exports the ISAIA collection globally…

image Neil Car

image Neil Car

The Hunterston Brooch ~
This famous early brooch with panels of gold filigree combining Celtic and Anglo-Saxon styles was made in the west of Scotland or Ireland around 700 AD.
This piece was found in 1830 on the Hunterston Estate in Ayrshire. It is a masterpiece of craft skills, and would have been worn by powerful nobles or clerics. Its style is typical of the region, combining Celtic and Anglo-Saxon influences.
It is made of silver, richly decorated with amber settings and panels of filigree goldwork representing interlaced beasts. The back has gilded interlaced decoration.
It had a long life, falling into the hands of Vikings around AD 1000 - a runic inscription on the back reads ‘Melbrigda owns this brooch’…

The Hunterston Brooch ~

This famous early brooch with panels of gold filigree combining Celtic and Anglo-Saxon styles was made in the west of Scotland or Ireland around 700 AD.

This piece was found in 1830 on the Hunterston Estate in Ayrshire. It is a masterpiece of craft skills, and would have been worn by powerful nobles or clerics. Its style is typical of the region, combining Celtic and Anglo-Saxon influences.

It is made of silver, richly decorated with amber settings and panels of filigree goldwork representing interlaced beasts. The back has gilded interlaced decoration.

It had a long life, falling into the hands of Vikings around AD 1000 - a runic inscription on the back reads ‘Melbrigda owns this brooch’…

Cameron Neilson

Cameron Neilson